cataract blindness | The Fred Hollows Foundation NZ

Tag term summary

  • Leading Eye Care Charity Calls on Supporters to Take Extreme Poverty Challenge

    The Fred Hollows Foundation NZ today announced that it will play an active role in Live Below the Line 2013, and called on the NZ public to take up the challenge and help end avoidable blindness.

  • New Zealand charity launches first mobile eye clinic for Pacific

    The Fred Hollows Foundation NZ today announces the launch of a new mobile eye clinic for Fiji. Designed, produced and funded by New Zealanders, the clinic is the first of its kind in the Pacific region: a state-of-the-art 11.5 metre facility which will travel to remote parts of Fiji, providing sight-saving services to blind people in need.

  • ‘Ana

    We first met ‘Ana on outreach to Tonga, the day before Mother’s Day and her 80th birthday. A widow, she lived with her sister Viviena in their parents’ house. ‘Ana was wheelchair-bound and cataract blind in both eyes. Life was not easy. 

  • Eseple

    We know how to restore sight – we just need you to make it happen. Your gift will help us take the miracle of sight to people like Eseple who live in remote communities across the Pacific.

  • Senmily

  • Meet Adam

    Special report by volunteer photographer, James Ensing-Trussell of Topic Photography Vanuatu: James recently attended a Fred Hollows Foundation funded surgical outreach visit to Vanuatu where he met Adam, a young man who was desperately in need of sight-restoring surgery.

  • Keeping Fred's dream alive

    Kiwi eye surgeon Fred Hollows had a vision of a world where no one is needlessly blind. He was driven by a deeply held conviction that everyone has the right to sight no matter who they are or where they live.

  • Ending avoidable blindness

    Kiwi eye surgeon and humanitarian Fred Hollows had a vision of ending avoidable blindness. He worked tirelessly to restore sight to the needlessly blind in developing countries and trained hundreds of local eye doctors to do the same. Making Fred’s vision a reality An estimated 39 million people around the world today are blind. But four out of five people who are blind don't have to be, their condition is treatable or preventable.

  • Skolastika

    18-year-old Skolastika can now live life to the full – playing basketball with her friends, going to school and helping her family on the farm – thanks to our generous supporters throughout New Zealand. Skolastika lives in an isolated village on the east coast of Makira Island, a remote island in the Solomon Islands. She lives a simple life. Her parents are subsistence farmers and Skolastika helps out when she can.

  • Satesh

    Seven-year-old Satesh lives in Labasa, Fiji. He was born with cataracts in both eyes. Sadly, the doctors diagnosed him with an eye infection and sent home with eye drops. His mother explained that his blurred vision has prevented him from attending school or making any friends.

  • Deonisia

    Deonisia lives in a little village called Tokou on the island of Ovalau, in Fiji. She is 64 years old and is completely blinded by cataract in both eyes. Cataract blindness can be easily reversed with a simple 20 minute operation that restores sight overnight.

  • The Miracle of Sight

    Watch as one woman has her sight restored after nine years of blindness. Deonisia was cataract blind for nine years before she had her sight restored by The Fred Hollows Foundation NZ. Sight restoring operations take less than 20 minutes and can cost as little as $25 in many developing countries.

  • Overseas

    "I believe that my view of what a redeemed 'social condition' is has been consistent - equity between people - and I've tried always to work to that end."  Not long after he moved to Australia in 1965, Fred visited a number of Aboriginal communities and was shocked by the deplorable standards of eye health. He was especially concerned with the high number of Aborigines who had trachoma, an infectious eye disease that is normally only found in developing countries.